The Good Egg Car Safety Blog

One third of 8 to 11 year olds not using the mandatory booster seat, says new report

One third of 8 to 11 year olds not using the mandatory booster seat, says new report

A shocking 34 per cent of 8 to 11-year olds in the UK are not using a booster seat on car journeys when one is required, according to a new report by Good Egg Safety.

Current UK law requires all children under 12 or less than 135cm in height to use a booster seat.

Using a booster seat provides older children with crucial protection. Parents have been advised to invest in a high-back booster seat for extra protection for older children, rather than a booster cushion.

Sarah-Jane Martin, spokesperson for Brake, the road safety charity said: "These figures are very worrying and show that we're not taking child car seat safety seriously enough. It's vital that all parents understand that it's not just toddlers who need protecting. We're supporting Good Egg Safety with this important awareness raising campaign and ask all parents to ensure that their child has the appropriate safety seat fitted."

Honor Byford, Chair of Road Safety GB, the charity that supports road safety professionals, said: "We know that every parent's strongest instinct is to protect their children. The legislation on booster seats changed to ensure that booster seats provide the level of protection that children's smaller bodies need in the event of a crash. This keeps them on a booster seat for longer than used to be the case. We urge parents to check out the legal requirements and keep their children on the right booster seat for as long as their child needs that extra protection – which is until they are tall enough for an adult seatbelt to fit their body.

Good Egg provides excellent, clear information and advice to help parents, grandparents and carers to provide the best protection for their children when they are travelling by car.

Your local road safety team will also be pleased to help and advise you on this or any road safety matter. You can find their contact details through the Road Safety GB website"

Kat Furlong Good Egg Safety Manager and Training Expert added: "A high-back booster is far more preferable to a booster cushion, to provide children with adequate head, neck and torso protection from side impacts, which booster cushions do not offer. We implore parents to buy these instead and ensure they are the right seat for their child and car"

The Good Egg Safety checks also showed that a high number of booster seats – both high-back models and cushions – were being used unsafely. In many instances, the seat belt was not routed properly around the child and seat, which would drastically reduce the seat's effectiveness in a collision.

Mark Bennett, Senior Technical and Training Manager Europe, Britax said

"It's imperative that older children do use the correct restraint system when travelling in a car until they no longer need so – when they're 135cm tall or 12 years old whichever comes sooner. High-back booster seats will not only guide and control the position of the adult seat belt correctly over the child's pelvis and shoulder but it will also give the much needed side and head protection in a road accident. As Britax we will continue campaigning on the safety benefits of high-back boosters and help save lives."

The National Police Chiefs' Council lead for roads policing Chief Constable Suzette Davenport said;

"The use of seatbelts and booster seats is an essential, effective method of reducing child fatalities and serious injuries in motor vehicle collisions. That's why their correct use is not a matter of choice, it is the law."

"I have no doubt that correctly used seat restraints for children have helped protect the most vulnerable from needless death and serious injury. So don't take any chances. "

For more information on booster seats, visit www.goodeggcarsafety.com/blog/goodmorningbritain

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Britax State of Safety Q&A

KatOur very own Good Egg Safety Expert, Kat, took over the Britax Twitter page last night to hold a Q&A. She received some great questions and you can find the answers below! Q: I’d love to know the laws on taxis and car seats. Kat: Under 3's - no seat required no seat belt. Over 3's - no seat, adult seat belt. Children should be in rear. We would prefer to see seats used whenever possible though!   Q: Hi Kat, when is the law coming in for rear facing longer? Kat: iSize came into effect in July 2013, it's part of R129 and will be fully implemented by 2018. R44 seats are still legal to use.   Q: When Picking A Car Seat, Especially One That Will Go Behind The Driver What Is The Best Kind Of Seat To Go For? Kat: It really depends on your child's weight and h......
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Global Road Safety Week Q&A!

Ask an expertToday our expert Kat took part in a live Q&A session over at Road Safety GB for Global Road Safety Week! The session was very busy, with lots of questions answered - the hottest topics were iSize and booster cushions. Do you have a burning question that isn't asked?  You can ask our experts at any time!     1. Is an extended rear facing seat really safer than a forward facing Group 2/3 car seat? Why? Child car seats which are tested under R44, are broken down into ‘group’ stages. The main stages are: Group 0+ (infant seat) Group 1 (toddler seat) Group 2,3 (booster seat) It is possible to have combinations of these seats, such as group 0+1, or group 123. Your question asks about group 2,3 car seats which are for children weighing 15kg, however, extended rear facing car seats are another option to group 1 toddler seats. Re......
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Tips for fitting a child car seat with a seat belt

Tip1Fitting a child car seat can be notoriously tricky, so we have put together our top tips to help you along the way! The key thing to remember with child car seats, is that not every seat fits every car.  It’s easy to think that a belt fitted seat will fit with any seat belt, but there are many potential problems that can undo all your hard work and cause your seat to be fitted dangerously.  Our blogs can help you learn about the dangers of buckle crunch, floor storage boxes and the most common fitting errors. It is important to seek help when choosing your child car seat, to ensure it is compatible with your car, and every car that the seat will be used in. Don't forget!  It also has to be suitable for your child!   Top 10 tips when fitting a child car seat with an adult seat b......
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Can I add a cushion to my child's booster seat?

Booster seatCan I put a cushion on the booster seat? A recent Ask the Expert question: “My child complains that the booster seat is too hard and that it hurts their bum. I have noticed that the seat is very hard, there’s no padding at all. Can I add a cushion to the seat to make it more comfy?” We have also had this enquiry in the past: "My 3 year old keeps escaping from the 5 point harness, so he has moved to a high back booster seat with adult seat belt.  The seat belt sits up on his neck though, even when it's through the red guide.  Can I put a cushion under him to lift him up more so it doesn't rub on his neck?" Example of what we've seen at our free car seat checking events           (NOTE: above pictures would be considered incorrectly fitte......
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5 Common Child Car Seat Fitting Errors

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One of our Good Egg Safety experts, Kat, demonstrates five of the most common car seat fitting errors that we come across at many of our child car seat checking events across the UK



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Car seat regulation labels

ECE R44.03 label

ECE R44.03

 

ECE R44.03 label

 

ECE R44.04


                                                          ECE R44.04 Label

 

R129 i-Size label

 

R129 iSize Label

 

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What is a group 1 car seat?

RubiGroup 1 car seats Group 1 car seats accommodate little ones that weigh between 9kg and 18kg.  After reading the previous Good Egg blog on group 0+ child car seats, you may have noticed that there is a crossover in the weight recommendations.  A rear facing group 0+ child seat will last until 13kg, yet a group 1 car seat says it is suitable from 9kg!  So are they just as safe as each other? The simple answer is No.  Forward facing your baby at 9kg is not as safe as keeping them rear facing to 13kg. If your child is moving up to a group 0+1 combination seat in rear facing mode, or an extended rear facing group 1 seat at 9kg, this isn’t such an issue as they still have the protection of being rear facing.   So when should you move to the next stage? The infant seat should b......
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Flying with young children (Part 3)

Top 8 tip when bringing a child car seat onto a plane  TUV approved child restraints As of the 21st May 2014, below are the TUV airline approved child car seats.  This list may be updated and if you are in any doubt, phone the manufacturer of your child car seat. Maxi Cosi Pebble   Maxi Cosi Citi   Britax Baby Safe   Britax Baby Safe Plus   Britax Baby Safe Plus SHR   Guardian Pro   Guardian Pro 2   Concord Ion   Kiddy:   Comfort Pro   Discovery Pro   Cruiserfix Pro   Energy Pro   Phoenix Pro   Phoenix fix Pro   Phoenix fix Pro 2   Guardian fix Pro   Guardian fix Pro 2   Britax Eclipse. Remember:  the final decision to allow a child restraint to be used lies with the airline. If you have any questions about flying with young children that our blog didn't address, please ask us and we will do the best ......
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What is a Group 0+ car seat?

Group 0+ Car Seat  A group 0+ car seat is 1 of 3 options you have for your baby’s first safety seat and can accommodate them from newborn all the way through to 13kg.  They are the most common first stage car seat and often form part of a ‘travel system’. All babies, toddlers and children are required by law to travel in a suitable child restraint with very few exceptions. The infant seat is backward facing, and ‘bucket’ like, cradling the baby with either a 3 or 5 point harness to strap them in.  You can expect to see a carry handle on the seat which has the dual purpose of allowing you to carry the baby into the house without disturbing them, and it also acts as a roll bar or rebound bar should you be involved in a collision.   Pros of using a group 0+ seat There are many advantages of using a 0+ seat, rat......
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