The Good Egg Car Safety Blog

Flying with young children (Part 3)

Top 8 tip when bringing a child car seat onto a plane

 

TUV approved child restraints


As of the 21st May 2014, below are the TUV airline approved child car seats.  This list may be updated and if you are in any doubt, phone the manufacturer of your child car seat.

    • Maxi Cosi Pebble

 

    • Maxi Cosi Citi

 

    • Britax Baby Safe

 

    • Britax Baby Safe Plus

 

    • Britax Baby Safe Plus SHR

 

    • Guardian Pro

 

    • Guardian Pro 2

 

    • Concord Ion

 

    • Kiddy:

 

    • Comfort Pro

 

    • Discovery Pro

 

    • Cruiserfix Pro

 

    • Energy Pro

 

    • Phoenix Pro

 

    • Phoenix fix Pro

 

    • Phoenix fix Pro 2

 

    • Guardian fix Pro

 

    • Guardian fix Pro 2

 

    • Britax Eclipse.



Remember:  the final decision to allow a child restraint to be used lies with the airline.

If you have any questions about flying with young children that our blog didn't address, please ask us and we will do the best we can to answer :)

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TUV approved means that the seat has been tested and approved by TUV Rheinland to be suitable for use on an aircraft.

 

  Go to part 1                                                                Go to part 2


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Is the Britax Prince TUV approved, its sold as suitable for Aircraft use?
Sunday, 12 July 2015 15:07
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5 point harness

Child car seats normally come with a 5 point harness to secure the child into their seat.  Some rear facing infant seats come with a 3 point harness. The job of the harness is restrain the child in an impact.



5 point harness



When forward facing, the harness spreads the force of an impact in 5 directions - across the shoulders, past the hips and through the crotch strap.  It is very important that a child rear faces for as long as possible, as when they are forward facing they are restrained by the harness, but their head continues with the forward momentum.  This puts stress and pressure on the neck that can result in serious injury or death.



5 point harness - close



By being rear facing, the 5 point harness still restrains the child, and in an impact they are pushed back into the child restraint, which spreads the force of an impact through the back of the child car seat and supports the child's head, neck and spine.  This is the reason it is so important to keep your child in their rear facing child seat until they have reached the weight limit, or the height limit.  Rear facing offers maximum protection and safety for your little one.  If you are unsure what the rear facing limit is on your seat, check the child seat manual or ask the child seat manufacturer.  The below chart also provides some guidelines:



Fitting chart

An alternative to the 5 point harness is an impact shield style child restraint, which we will explore in a future post.

 

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Guest — Ella@Mechanic Dandenong
My baby is about 9 months old, so which option would be best for him 0 or 1. There is confusion between these two options.
Monday, 19 May 2014 07:29
Guest — Good Egg Safety
Hi Ella, The most suitable child restraint is determined by your child's weight, and then if they fit in the seat. There is a cr... Read More
Tuesday, 20 May 2014 09:28
Guest — Thomas
I understand that eventually a child has to sit in a forward facing seat however would you agree that the back seats are the safes... Read More
Thursday, 29 May 2014 14:39
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What is a group 0+1 car seat?

 

Group 0+1 car seats are a combination of group 0 or 0+ and group 1. They backward face until 10kg for group 0 or until 13kg for group 0+, they then either remain rear facing to 18kg, or can be used forward facing 9-18kg, depending on the seat.  It is vitally important that you read your car seat manual so you are fully aware of how long your seat can backward face.

 

 

How are group 0+1 car seats different to group 0+ car seats?


Group 0+1 car seats are different in several ways.  Firstly, they are not portable like the infant carrier seats and generally stay fitted in the car at all times.  When a baby is asleep it would be difficult to remove the group 0+1 seat from the car without disturbing little one, so you’d have to take them out of the seat.  Unlike group 0+ car seats, group 0+1 seats are not used as part of a travel system.  They do however accommodate little ones from newborn right up to 18kg, which is approximately 4 years old.  They are generally well padded with a soft newborn insert and 5 point harness.



Group 0+1 car seat

 

Why use one?


There are several plus points for choosing a group 0+1 car seat.  They are generally around the same price as an infant carrier, but last much longer – making better value for money!  As they stay put in the car, you also have complete peace of mind that the car seat is fitted correctly on every journey.  Group 0+1 seats are particularly good for grandparent’s cars that may not take the baby out so often.  They can leave the seat fitted into the car so they don’t have to worry about fitting the seat themselves.  They are also a great choice for carers of children who need to use the seat for children of varying ages. As group 0+1 seats are a full sized group 1, it is very unlikely the baby will outgrow the seat by height when used backward facing.  This means that baby can stay in the safest rear facing position right up until they hit the rear facing weight limit for the seat!



Group 0+1 Blackboard

 

 

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I loved our Britax First Class Plus. Took it on holiday and Caitlyn stayed in that as she was less then 13kg and Henry used the in... Read More
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Flying with young children (Part 2)

 

When flying with young children, what do you need to know to help you decide if you are going to take a car seat with you for the plane? That is what we are going to explore in this 3 part ‘Flying with young children’ mini blog series.

 

Using UK seats abroad


All child car seats within the European Union (EU) are tested to ECE  R44.04 or R129 i-Size.  Child seats carrying the ECE approval R44.03, R44.04 or R129 (i-Size) may be used within the European Union.

If you wish to use your child car seat when you reach your destination, it is worth noting that an EU approved child restraint cannot normally be used in countries outside of the EU.  This is because different countries have different laws and testing that European Union seats may not meet.  The same is true for any seat outside of the EU that is brought over to Europe.

As an example, a parent flying to the USA may be allowed to use their child restraint on the aircraft, but once they land, their seat cannot then be used in a car or taxi.

If you are from the UK and flying to a destination within the EU, then you can use your UK car seat when you are on holiday.

If you are unsure check with your holiday provider, the local road safety department or the British embassy in that country.

 

Using a child car seat at your destination

 

If you hire a car when you get to your destination many hire companies will also hire out child car seats at an additional cost. If you decide to do this ensure that you are completely happy with the child car seat’s quality and that you have fitted it correctly.

 

If you are not happy with the seat you can also choose to purchase one whilst on holiday. This could potentially work out cost effective if you were using the hire car for the whole duration of the holiday.

Even if you are not hiring a car, some countries require children to travel in a suitable child restraint in taxis. Some taxi firm’s will have specific vehicles with restraints fitted, however it is wise to check with the taxi firm or transport company you will be using to reach your hotel.

Travelling by coach transfer also needs to be confirmed, firstly to see if you need a child restraint, and also if your child restraint can be used, should you want to use it - even if you don’t have to.

As always, when you are fitting the car seat in the car or on the coach, make sure that it is a compatible fit and correctly fitted.

 

Go to part 1                                                                  Go to part 3


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What is a Group 0+ car seat?

 

A group 0+ car seat is 1 of 3 options you have for your baby’s first safety seat and can accommodate them from newborn all the way through to 13kg.  They are the most common first stage car seat and often form part of a ‘travel system’.

All babies, toddlers and children are required by law to travel in a suitable child restraint with very few exceptions.

The infant seat is backward facing, and ‘bucket’ like, cradling the baby with either a 3 or 5 point harness to strap them in.  You can expect to see a carry handle on the seat which has the dual purpose of allowing you to carry the baby into the house without disturbing them, and it also acts as a roll bar or rebound bar should you be involved in a collision.



Group 0+ Car Seat

 

Pros of using a group 0+ seat


There are many advantages of using a 0+ seat, rather than a group 0. Group 0+ seats will last longer than the group 0, as it has a 3kg higher weight limit – they can quite often last a baby until they are 12-18 months.  As they are rear facing, they offer maximum safety right up to 13kg.

The fitment of these seats makes them suitable for a wide range of cars, which is handy if the baby regularly travels in different vehicles.  They are also very portable, making it easy to take the seat between the car and house, or you can often clip them onto the pram.

The '90 Minute Maximum Rule' is the recommended amount of time a baby should spend in their car seat.  Ensure you take this into account when using your seat as part of your travel system.

Your baby must ALWAYS travel in their car seat when in the car, even if the journey is more than 90 minutes long; plan regular break stops so the little one can safely have time out of the seat.

Group 0+ seats also come with sunshades, newborn inserts and the carry handle.



Group 0+ car seat tip

Always check your child car seat's instruction on fitting – especially on the positioning of the carry handle!  The handle quite often acts as a roll bar or rebound bar, and it must be in the proper position at all times when in the car.

 

Choosing Group 0+ seat


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Brilliant post!
Tuesday, 13 May 2014 14:10
Guest — What is a group 0+1 car seat? | Good Egg Child Car Seat Safety
[…] of group 0 or 0+ and group 1. They backward face until 10kg for group 0 or until 13kg for group 0+, they then either rem... Read More
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Hey I am so grateful I found your blog page, I really found you by mistake, while I was browsing on Askjeeve for something else,... Read More
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Flying with young children (Part 1)

 

There are lots of blogs and advice guides out there giving fantastic hints and tips for parents travelling or flying with young children. Many of them mention to take a child car seat, but it isn’t always as easy and straightforward as that.

What do you need to know to help you decide if you are going to take a car seat with you for the plane? That is what we are going to explore in this 3 part 'Flying with young children' mini blog series.

For a long time while in planes young children have travelled on their parents lap and babies in bassinets.  Yet more and more parents are concerned and want their child in a proper restraint. Using a car seat on the plane gives you a safe and secure place to secure your baby should you hit turbulence.



Flying with young children 1

 

See the full story here!

Car seats also give little ones a properly secured place for take off and landing - the most dangerous parts of the flight! They can also protect the child in an emergency landing, as this story shows:



Flying with young children 2

Blog Quick tip

Slings and carriers are not deemed safe for take off and landing and you will be requested to remove little one and hold them on your lap.

 

What you need to know about taking a car seat on board!

 

1. You will have to buy your baby/child their own seat on the plane


Some airlines will allow you to take a seat on board without having booked the child their own seat - yet this is not guaranteed to keep the family together and there may not be any spare seats left when it comes to boarding.  The airline may also refuse even if there is space. It is advisable to start off with paying for the plane seat for the child.

Blog Quick tip

Before paying out for a separate seat for your child (unless you were opting to regardless of using a child seat!) make sure your airline will allow the use of the child seat.

 

2. It must be a TUV approved child car seat


There are some UK child seats that are TUV approved for use on aircraft.  Having a TUV approved seat does not guarantee that you will be allowed to use it - the decision resides with the airline.  It also does not mean that you can’t use a different seat that is not TUV approved.  If the seat is not TUV approved you must remember that airplanes only have lap belts and the child restraint must be certified to be fitted with a lap belt.

Blog Jargon buster

TUV approved means that the seat has been tested and approved by TUV Rheinland to be suitable for use on an aircraft.

 

3. Confirm that the make and model of your seat is allowed


When you confirm with the airline that you can take your own child seat on the plane, also confirm with them if the make and model of your seat is allowed, and what child seats they accept; you need to ensure this whether your seat is approved or not. You don’t want to get to check-in to be told that you cannot take your seat on board.  If you can, get confirmation from the airline that you can use the child seat in writing and take this with you to show the airline staff if needed.  If the child seat that your child normally uses is not approved or allowed then you will need to buy a new one.

Blog Quick tip

Children over the age of 2 must have their own plane seat purchased - always check your airline’s policy.


Flying with young children 3


It is also worth checking to see if your airline supplies child seats. Virgin Atlantic states that it can supply child restraints on international flights, so long as they are pre-booked.

 

Go to part 2                                                                  Go to part 3


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Inflatable car seat

Imagine how lovely it would be not to have a big, bulky car seat in the car.  But instead have an inflatable car seat that is easy to transport, doesn’t take up much room, keeps your child even safer by having them rear facing… and you can pack their car seat up in a little back pack when not in use!

 

Introducing a new concept from Volvo!

 

 

Inflatable Car Seat 1

 


This incredible concept is a rear facing inflatable car seat that is easily inflated or deflated in just 40 seconds!  It can pack up into a small backpack and weighs just 11 lbs - no more hulking around heavy car seats!  As it is a rear facing seat it even provides far greater protection to children than front facing seats!



Inflatable Car Seat 2

 

The possibilities of this seat are endless - it will be perfect as a spare seat for taking friends' children in the car, or you can pack it up and send your little one to nursery with it if they are getting picked up by someone else.  It is great for families who don’t have a car but want their child to have a car seat in a taxi.  It is also brilliant for holidays, hire cars or for family members vehicles, who perhaps don’t take the little one out enough to warrant their own seat - but enough to make transferring your seat a pain!


This seat is a concept in the US, Volvo UK do not know if it will be available for the UK market when and if it goes into production - but if this seat is just as safe as other rear facing seats, wouldn’t it be a great option!





Parents will naturally have a few concerns about a car seat that inflates.  The material will have to be puncture proof, and the button to inflate/deflate will need to be child proofed.  As well as it passing all the tests.

How would this make your life easier? Would you want to see this in the UK?  Comment below!



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I'm excited! We already have the 'bubblebum' so I'm very interested in following this if or when it goes into trials. ... Read More
Monday, 14 April 2014 18:27
Guest — Sofia
We just got a new car so that it would be safer when the baby comes. Now we have to fine the perfect seat! Do all seats fit in all... Read More
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Guest — Good Egg Safety
Hi Sofia, see yesterday's blog post which touches on this question http://www.goodeggcarsafety.com/blog/do-child-car-seats-fit-in-... Read More
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What is a Group 0 car seat?

 

The group 0 car seat is the very first stage and has the lowest weight range.

 

Car seat stages can be confusing at the best of times and trying to understand which seat does what and what that group number means can be very frustrating!

 

Child seats are grouped based on the weight of the child that they can accommodate.

 

As an example:  A group 0+ seat is suitable from newborn to 13kg rear facing, a group 1 seat can accommodate a child between 9-18kg forward facing or some rear facing.  Therefore if you wanted a seat that could carry your baby from newborn right through to 18kg, it would be referred to as a 'group 0+1' - as it covers both weight categories!

 

A group 0 car seat is suitable from newborn up to 10kg – approx. 6 months old.

 

These seats are generally lie-flat carriers, but there are some old rear facing infant seats and some  0-1 seats that only rear face to 10kg – so it’s very important to check your seat for its weight limit!

 

You can find your seats weight limit on the orange sticker (below), which will be on your restraint.


Group 0 car seat label

 

Benefits of a Group 0 car seat

 

Not only is the lie flat carrier suitable for use in the car, they also clip to the pram chassis – like the more common rear facing infant carrier does.  The big benefit that this has over the rear facing infant carrier is that there is no time restraint on how long baby can be in the seat.

 

As the group 0 car seat lies flat, it keeps the baby’s spine in the most natural position and also helps keep their lungs open, so they can breathe freely.  Due to this lie flat position, they are particularly good for premature or tiny babies.

 

Lie flat carriers can also double up as a day bed or as an over night travel bed – so they are very versatile!

 

The fitment of the seat places the baby’s head in the center of the car – the safest place.

 

Things to consider

 

Lie flat carriers can be much heavier than infant carriers so popping into a shop carrying the baby in the seat won’t be a frequent occurrence!  The seat will really need to either stay in the car or be put on the pram chassis.  Some of the seat options are also on the large side, making them too bulky to carry comfortably.

 

These seats can also be trickier to fit than rear facing infant carriers.  They generally have clips that attach to the adult seat belt, which then clips to the seat, securing it tightly in place (see below).  Some lie flat carriers may have an option of an ISOFIX base.

 


 Group 0 car seat belt




Lie flat carriers take up 2 seat spaces in the car.  This needs to be considered if you regularly take passengers in the back of the car or if you have other children.



Group 0 car seat


 

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